STUDENT
TEACHER

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STUDENT
TEACHER

Act 1

STUDENT
TEACHER

QUICK LINKS


FILES


STUDENT
TEACHER

Act 1

In this 3 Act Task, we use a balance with money bags and coins to illustrate solving a linear equation. Students are asked to figure out how many coins are in an unknown money bag by logically reasoning through changes that can be made to both sides of the balance - similar to changes we might make to both sides of an equation.

ACT 1

Inspiring Interest

ENGAGE
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1.
Before presenting the Act 1 video, ask students to consider the following questions as they watch:
β€œWhat do you notice? What do you wonder?”
β€œIs there anything that sticks out?”
β€œIs there anything that reminds you of something else?”
β€œWhat are you curious to know?”

2.
Present the Act 1 video.

3.
After presenting the Act 1 video, allow students to share their initial thoughts.

4.
Replay the Act 1 video and continue with the following questions:
β€œWhat do you think is the solution to the puzzle?”
β€œAre there any predictions you’d automatically rule out? Why or why not?”
β€œWhat additional information would help you make a more confident prediction?”

5.
After allowing students to share their initial predictions, proceed to Act 2.

ACT 2

Stimulating Thinking

ENGAGE
β€”
1.
Before presenting the Act 2 video, ask students to be on the lookout for new information that will help them refine their predictions.

2.
Present the Act 2 video.

3.
After presenting the Act 2 video, prompt students to consider the following questions:
β€œHow does this new information affect your initial prediction?”
β€œAre there any changes you’d like to make? Why or why not?”

4.
Give students time to finalize their predictions.

5.
Continue with the following questions:
β€œWhat is your final prediction?”
β€œWhat is the reasoning behind your prediction?”
β€œHow does your prediction and reasoning compare to others in the class?”

6.
After allowing students to share their final predictions, proceed to Act 3.

ACT 3

Illuminating Teacher Moves

ENGAGE
β€”
1.
Before presenting the Act 3 video, celebrate the process! πŸ₯³
Remind students that regardless of whether or not their prediction turns out to be correct, everyone has already successfully completed the activity by putting their existing knowledge to work and engaging in critical thinking.

2.
Present the Act 3 video.

3.
After presenting the Act 3 video, take some time to validate students’ reactions.
Irrespective of whether or not their prediction is correct, students may experience a variety of emotions including, but not limited to:
Encouragement, joy, curiosity, excitement
Discouragement, frustration, confusion, and apathy
Take some time to reflect on who your students are and how you can leverage their unique personalities to guide their emotions to a place of awareness and appreciation for the learning that is taking place.
EXPLORE
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EXPLAIN
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ELABORATE
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EVALUATE
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CALCULATOR
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Linear Equations Calculator

What variable are you solving for?
We have some questions for you! Help us out through this
INTRO
β€”
An equation is a math sentence that uses an equals sign to tell us two values or expressions are equal.

Think of an equation as a scale. If we change one side of the equation, we have to do the same thing to the other side to keep the equation balanced (true).

Try playing around with the scale below to see for yourself!

Now let’s take a look at another equation:

Notice that this equation mostly just has numbers, but it also has an in there. This is what we call a variable.

In math, a variable is a symbol, usually a letter like , that represents a number or value we don’t know yet but want to find.

This equation is also an example of a linear equation. A linear equation is an equation that does not have any variables with exponents, and when graphed, forms a straight line.
Solving a linear equation is all about finding the unknown value of a variable.

If we imagine the equation as weights on a scale, the variable is like a weight with an unknown value that we can solve for once we get it by itself.

To isolate the variable, we use inverse operations, which undo the effects of other operations.

Remember, we have to apply the inverse operations to both sides of the equation to keep the equation balanced.

Think of this as needing to add the same weight to both sides to keep the scale balanced.

Check out our
Calculator
or explore our
Lesson
and
Practice
sections to learn more about solving linear equations and test your understanding.

You can also use the Quick Links menu on the left to jump to a section of your choice.

You can also use the Quick Links dropdown above to jump to a section of your choice.

KEY STEPS
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How to Solve Linear Equations

Step 1. Move all the terms with the unknown variable to one side of the equation.

Use inverse operations to do this.
Make sure to do the same inverse operation on both sides to keep the equation balanced.

Step 2. Move all the terms with known values or variables to the other side of the equation.

Use inverse operations to do this.
Make sure to do the same inverse operation on both sides to keep the equation balanced.

Step 3. Isolate the unknown variable.

Since division is the inverse operation of multiplication, we divide both sides by the number the variable is multiplied by.
LESSON
β€” Solving Linear Equations
PRACTICE
β€” Solving Linear Equations
CONCLUSION
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